Color palette

THE COLOR WHEEL

The relationship between our primary, secondary, and accent colors.

PRIMARY COLORS

Always use at least one primary color.

SECONDARY COLORS

Use secondary colors in conjunction with primary colors, as needed.

ACCENT COLORS

Accent colors should be used sparingly, only as “pops” of color.

COLOR FORMULAS

How would you describe our brand green? Grass? Emerald? Chartreuse? This color confusion led to the practice of standardized formulas, both for printed and digitalized materials.

PRIMARY COLORS

PMS 362 C

C 74 M 15 Y 100 K 2

R 80 G 158 B 47

HEX #509E2F

PMS 3288 C

C 100 M 23 Y 73 K 9

R 0 G 130 B 100

HEX #008264

PMS 294 C

C 100 M 75 Y 8 K 35

R 0 G 46 B 109

HEX #002E6D

SECONDARY COLORS

Use to support primary colors.

PMS 268 C

C 87 M 99 Y 0 K 8

R 88 G 44 B 131

HEX #582C83

PMS Cool Gray 10 C

C 23 M 16 Y 13 K 53

R 95 G 98 B 102

HEX #5F6266

ACCENT COLORS

Use sparingly as accents only.

PMS 7704 C

C 93 M 4 Y 8 K 24

R 0 G 131 B 185

HEX #0083B9

PMS 144 C

C 0 M 51 Y 100 K 0

R 235 G 139 B 0

HEX #EB8B00

PMS 381 C

C 25 M 0 Y 98 K 0

R 206 G 220 B 0

HEX #CEDC00

PMS 621 C

C 13 M 1 Y 13 K 2

R 206 G 224 B 215

HEX #CEE0D7

PANTONE® COLORS (PMS)

The Pantone Color Matching System is the standardized format for printing. This ensures colors match even if printed by different manufacturers.

CMYK

Use this mode when creating something that will be physically printed, like a brochure, poster, sign, postcard, or magazine.

RGB

Use this mode when creating something that will be viewed on a monitor or screen, like a website, blog, email, banner ad, or social media post.

HEX

This code is assigned to colors viewed digitally; since shades appear different depending on the monitor, assigning a code to them ensures consistency.

Photography

OUR PHOTO STYLE

As a “People First” company, we want our people to shine through in all our photography. This section will give you tips and examples of ways to put people as the focal point of an image, just like they’re the focal point of our entire business.

Photography is an important element of the Ultimate Software visual identity. Images should be

People-oriented - Candid - Real - Aspirational - Bright

MAINTAINING A VISION WITH SIMPLE TECHNIQUES

If a picture says a thousand words, what would we want ours to say? The Ultimate Software brand voice, believe it or not, can be captured in an image by using certain photographic elements: natural lighting, shallow depth of field, asymmetrical framing, real moments, and interesting angles. These are good rules of thumb whether you’re shooting a picture or just choosing one.

NATURAL LIGHTING

Sunlight is always more flattering than a camera flash. Try opening the blinds or finding an area near a window. Always remember to have your subject face the light source instead of being back lit by a window.

SHALLOW DEPTH OF FIELD

Keep the subject close to the camera. This makes the background slightly blurry, so you can still see the scene without drawing focus from the subject.

RULE OF THIRDS

Imagine there are lines splitting the picture into thirds, both horizontally and vertically. Position the subject on the lines to create a better shape while freeing up space for typography.

REAL MOMENTS

Try to avoid the use of staged presentation shots (“grip and grin”), static group shots, or shots of peoples’ backs. Capture subjects in their normal working environment by having them pretend you’re not there. Staged shots feel less authentic.

INTERESTING ANGLES

Don’t be afraid to tilt and slant the camera for a different angle, but make sure it doesn’t take the focus away from the subject.

Yes!

Bright - People-oriented - Fresh

Candid - Authentic

USING YOUR PHONE TO TAKE PHOTOS

In a vibrant culture like ours, interesting photo opportunities can arise at any time. Smartphones are a convenient way to capture these moments for possible use in brand communications. Follow these handy tips to get the best image quality possible.

Yes!
  • NICE NATURAL LIGHTING
  • UNIQUE COMPOSITION
  • CORRECT EXPOSURE
  • INTERESTING BACKGROUND
no thanks :(
  • HARSH LIGHTING (USE OF FLASH)
  • BORING COMPOSITION
  • UNDER-EXPOSED BACKGROUND
  • CLUTTERED BACKGROUND

CAMERA PHONE TIPS

When using your phone for photography, always hold it sideways.

Avoid appying filters to the images. These can be applied later by the design team if desired.

Never shoot with your light source behind your subject and avoid using your camera’s flash.

If your subject is in an uninteresting location, you can move to a more visually appealing one.

If your phone has an “HDR” setting, turn it on for better photos.

Try new interesting angles and avoid the overly used.

Icongraphy

ICONOGRAPHY GRAPHICS

Icons are used as a tool to convey an idea or expression quickly. In situations like product profiles, icons are used as a way to draw the eye to important features and benefits. For situations where copy is sparse, icons fill in missing bits of information to help the viewer make an informed decision in a fraction of a second.

GREEN

These are the main icons, to be used when printing on white paper, or digitally on white backgrounds.

REVERSE

These are best used on colored or filled backgrounds, both printed and digitally.